Picturing Pontefract Castle

The rustic bridge crossing the kitchen ovens in about 1930-40 [Click here to open image in popup]
The rustic bridge crossing the kitchen ovens in about 1930-40
The rustic bridge crossing the kitchen ovens in about 1930-40
The keep seen from the 'rustic' bridge in the kitchens in 1902 after the grounds were opened as a park. The view has been 'improved' by linking the remains of the curtain wall to the terrace door and keep. The path from the steps has been diverted and the artist has re-aligned the window shaped hole at the top of the keep to improve the composition [Click here to open image in popup]
The keep seen from the 'rustic' bridge in the kitchens in 1902 after the grounds were opened as a park. The view has been 'improved' by linking the remains of the curtain wall to the terrace door and keep. The path from the steps has been diverted and the artist has re-aligned the window shaped hole at the top of the keep to improve the composition
The keep seen from the 'rustic' bridge in the kitchens in 1902 after the grounds were opened as a park. The view has been 'improved' by linking the remains of the curtain wall to the terrace door and keep. The path from the steps has been diverted and the artist has re-aligned the window shaped hole at the top of the keep to improve the composition
Castle entrance around 1960 [Click here to open image in popup]
Castle entrance around 1960
Castle entrance around 1960
The keep from the sally port [behind the 'rustic' fence] c. 1900-20 [Click here to open image in popup]
The keep from the sally port [behind the 'rustic' fence] c. 1900-20
The keep from the sally port [behind the 'rustic' fence] c. 1900-20
The stonework at the base of the Royal Apartments, looking north towards the Victorian steps leading from the bailey to the upper level [photo 1950-1960] [Click here to open image in popup]
The stonework at the base of the Royal Apartments, looking north towards the Victorian steps leading from the bailey to the upper level [photo 1950-1960]
The stonework at the base of the Royal Apartments, looking north towards the Victorian steps leading from the bailey to the upper level [photo 1950-1960]
Victorian rockery built up below the keep c. 1945-55 [Click here to open image in popup]
Victorian rockery built up below the keep c. 1945-55
Victorian rockery built up below the keep c. 1945-55
Cartoons drawn by N C Nicholl in 1886. Two pages were entitled strangers in Pontefract where the artist draws himself visiting the town and the castle in particular. On the first page the visitor looks at the bailey with tennis court and grass roller commenting 'dear me what a lively place'. Looking down into the 'magazine' the visitor comments 'looks inviting' to say the least [the trap door of the magazine is surrounded by rustic fencing]. On the second page Nicholls draws himself looking east from the terrace to the Royal Apartments with the rustic shelter still visible on the top. The next sketch shows the visitor between the keep and the kitchen looking at the shield shaped signs which identified different parts of the site, he comments 'King Richard is supposed to have kicked the bucket in this spot, ah!' [This sign was probably based on the steel engraving in Fox's History of Pontefract, which also claims that Richard died in that part of the castle. The last drawing shows the visitor on tip-toes looking through a hole in the keep wall towards Saint Giles and the town centre. This hole was a victorian 'improvement' to make the ruins more picturesque. That origianl wall, having been weakend, later collapsed [Click here to open image in popup]
Cartoons drawn by N C Nicholl in 1886. Two pages were entitled strangers in Pontefract where the artist draws himself visiting the town and the castle in particular. On the first page the visitor looks at the bailey with tennis court and grass roller commenting 'dear me what a lively place'. Looking down into the 'magazine' the visitor comments 'looks inviting' to say the least [the trap door of the magazine is surrounded by rustic fencing]. On the second page Nicholls draws himself looking east from the terrace to the Royal Apartments with the rustic shelter still visible on the top. The next sketch shows the visitor between the keep and the kitchen looking at the shield shaped signs which identified different parts of the site, he comments 'King Richard is supposed to have kicked the bucket in this spot, ah!' [This sign was probably based on the steel engraving in Fox's History of Pontefract, which also claims that Richard died in that part of the castle. The last drawing shows the visitor on tip-toes looking through a hole in the keep wall towards Saint Giles and the town centre. This hole was a victorian 'improvement' to make the ruins more picturesque. That origianl wall, having been weakend, later collapsed
Cartoons drawn by N C Nicholl in 1886. Two pages were entitled strangers in Pontefract where the artist draws himself visiting the town and the castle in particular. On the first page the visitor looks at the bailey with tennis court and grass roller commenting 'dear me what a lively place'. Looking down into the 'magazine' the visitor comments 'looks inviting' to say the least [the trap door of the magazine is surrounded by rustic fencing]. On the second page Nicholls draws himself looking east from the terrace to the Royal Apartments with the rustic shelter still visible on the top. The next sketch shows the visitor between the keep and the kitchen looking at the shield shaped signs which identified different parts of the site, he comments 'King Richard is supposed to have kicked the bucket in this spot, ah!' [This sign was probably based on the steel engraving in Fox's History of Pontefract, which also claims that Richard died in that part of the castle. The last drawing shows the visitor on tip-toes looking through a hole in the keep wall towards Saint Giles and the town centre. This hole was a victorian 'improvement' to make the ruins more picturesque. That origianl wall, having been weakend, later collapsed
Detail of a page in Fox's manuscript for 'The History of Pontefract'. The official emblem has a solid foreground instead of the wavey lines representing water [below this emblem is a version of the De Lacy heraldic knot] [Click here to open image in popup]
Detail of a page in Fox's manuscript for 'The History of Pontefract'. The official emblem has a solid foreground instead of the wavey lines representing water [below this emblem is a version of the De Lacy heraldic knot]
Detail of a page in Fox's manuscript for 'The History of Pontefract'. The official emblem has a solid foreground instead of the wavey lines representing water [below this emblem is a version of the De Lacy heraldic knot]
Siege map of the castle during the Civil War. This version of the map was drawn by George Fox in the 1820s. He names the towers going clockwise; Round Tower [Keep], Red Tower, Treasures Tower, Swillington Tower, Kings, Queens and Constable's. These are different from names and positions to the accepted ones today. The terrace is identified as a bowling green [Click here to open image in popup]
Siege map of the castle during the Civil War. This version of the map was drawn by George Fox in the 1820s. He names the towers going clockwise; Round Tower [Keep], Red Tower, Treasures Tower, Swillington Tower, Kings, Queens and Constable's. These are different from names and positions to the accepted ones today. The terrace is identified as a bowling green
Siege map of the castle during the Civil War. This version of the map was drawn by George Fox in the 1820s. He names the towers going clockwise; Round Tower [Keep], Red Tower, Treasures Tower, Swillington Tower, Kings, Queens and Constable's. These are different from names and positions to the accepted ones today. The terrace is identified as a bowling green
Second floor extension to an existing building off Jubilee Way. This structure was added in 2007, with decorative crenalations like the Edward VII extension the Infirmary and Pontefract Castle Moat House on North Baileygate [Click here to open image in popup]
Second floor extension to an existing building off Jubilee Way. This structure was added in 2007, with decorative crenalations like the Edward VII extension the Infirmary and Pontefract Castle Moat House on North Baileygate
Second floor extension to an existing building off Jubilee Way. This structure was added in 2007, with decorative crenalations like the Edward VII extension the Infirmary and Pontefract Castle Moat House on North Baileygate
The Curtain Wall photographed in the 1940s when it was still covered in ivy and showed the window shaped feature. The topiary bushes are at the top of the steps with the port cullis slots. A rustic shelter is also visible on the site of the later Vetrans Shelter [Click here to open image in popup]
The Curtain Wall photographed in the 1940s when it was still covered in ivy and showed the window shaped feature. The topiary bushes are at the top of the steps with the port cullis slots. A rustic shelter is also visible on the site of the later Vetrans Shelter
The Curtain Wall photographed in the 1940s when it was still covered in ivy and showed the window shaped feature. The topiary bushes are at the top of the steps with the port cullis slots. A rustic shelter is also visible on the site of the later Vetrans Shelter
Castle kitchens looking towards the keep. The terrace is still laid out as a park, with hedges, steps and formal planting. This whole area was cleared to show more of the archaeology in 1984-1985 [Click here to open image in popup]
Castle kitchens looking towards the keep. The terrace is still laid out as a park, with hedges, steps and formal planting. This whole area was cleared to show more of the archaeology in 1984-1985
Castle kitchens looking towards the keep. The terrace is still laid out as a park, with hedges, steps and formal planting. This whole area was cleared to show more of the archaeology in 1984-1985
Liquorice tin in an 'art nouveau' style from about 1900. The castle ruins are shown after the Victorians have turned the site into a park. The top of the keep shows a 'window' shaped hole which was knocked through the archaeology to create a distant view of St. Giles. The weakened wall later collapsed. [Click here to open image in popup]
Liquorice tin in an 'art nouveau' style from about 1900. The castle ruins are shown after the Victorians have turned the site into a park. The top of the keep shows a 'window' shaped hole which was knocked through the archaeology to create a distant view of St. Giles. The weakened wall later collapsed.
Liquorice tin in an 'art nouveau' style from about 1900. The castle ruins are shown after the Victorians have turned the site into a park. The top of the keep shows a 'window' shaped hole which was knocked through the archaeology to create a distant view of St. Giles. The weakened wall later collapsed.
Emblem of castle on silver badge for the King's School, Pontefract which was made by Fattorini's of Leeds [Click here to open image in popup]
Emblem of castle on silver badge for the King's School, Pontefract which was made by Fattorini's of Leeds
Emblem of castle on silver badge for the King's School, Pontefract which was made by Fattorini's of Leeds
A version of the Mayor's seal with an emblem of the castle in the top right quarter [Click here to open image in popup]
A version of the Mayor's seal with an emblem of the castle in the top right quarter
A version of the Mayor's seal with an emblem of the castle in the top right quarter
Silvered 19th century button of the Pontefract Volunteers which adapts one of the official emblems and adds a crown above. The tallest tower has an extra long narrow flag like the personal flags of, medieval monarchs [Click here to open image in popup]
Silvered 19th century button of the Pontefract Volunteers which adapts one of the official emblems and adds a crown above. The tallest tower has an extra long narrow flag like the personal flags of, medieval monarchs
Silvered 19th century button of the Pontefract Volunteers which adapts one of the official emblems and adds a crown above. The tallest tower has an extra long narrow flag like the personal flags of, medieval monarchs
Official emblem of the borough with a royalist political slogen adopted after the execution of Charles I in 1649 'post mortem patris pro filio' [after the death of the father we are for the son] [Click here to open image in popup]
Official emblem of the borough with a royalist political slogen adopted after the execution of Charles I in 1649 'post mortem patris pro filio' [after the death of the father we are for the son]
Official emblem of the borough with a royalist political slogen adopted after the execution of Charles I in 1649 'post mortem patris pro filio' [after the death of the father we are for the son]
This emblem for the Pontefract and District Archaeological Society combines three elements, the castle, the de Lacy heraldic knot and the Yorkshire white rose. [Click here to open image in popup]
This emblem for the Pontefract and District Archaeological Society combines three elements, the castle, the de Lacy heraldic knot and the Yorkshire white rose.
This emblem for the Pontefract and District Archaeological Society combines three elements, the castle, the de Lacy heraldic knot and the Yorkshire white rose.
Official Emblem of the Borough on an 18th century strip map. The castle is flanked on either side by two door ways [which look like a cruet set!] The central tower/keep looks as if it is collapsing. [Click here to open image in popup]
Official Emblem of the Borough on an 18th century strip map. The castle is flanked on either side by two door ways [which look like a cruet set!] The central tower/keep looks as if it is collapsing.
Official Emblem of the Borough on an 18th century strip map. The castle is flanked on either side by two door ways [which look like a cruet set!] The central tower/keep looks as if it is collapsing.
Official Emblem of the Borough on an 18th century strip map. The castle is flanked on either side by two doorways [which look like a cruet set!] [Click here to open image in popup]
Official Emblem of the Borough on an 18th century strip map. The castle is flanked on either side by two doorways [which look like a cruet set!]
Official Emblem of the Borough on an 18th century strip map. The castle is flanked on either side by two doorways [which look like a cruet set!]
Another version of a siege plan drawn during the Civil War. The trench-forts of the besiegers are different from all other plans. Other features include a 'ditch or moat' not only on the west but also to the east protecting the royal apartments and the inner barbican. The buildings in the two barbicans are described as the 'King's Stable' and the 'Great Laith.' The wall running due south from the keep is called the 'Flanken Wall'. The bailey also includes references to a 'conduit', a 'magazine' and a 'bowling green' on the terrace [Click here to open image in popup]
Another version of a siege plan drawn during the Civil War. The trench-forts of the besiegers are different from all other plans. Other features include a 'ditch or moat' not only on the west but also to the east protecting the royal apartments and the inner barbican. The buildings in the two barbicans are described as the 'King's Stable' and the 'Great Laith.' The wall running due south from the keep is called the 'Flanken Wall'. The bailey also includes references to a 'conduit', a 'magazine' and a 'bowling green' on the terrace
Another version of a siege plan drawn during the Civil War. The trench-forts of the besiegers are different from all other plans. Other features include a 'ditch or moat' not only on the west but also to the east protecting the royal apartments and the inner barbican. The buildings in the two barbicans are described as the 'King's Stable' and the 'Great Laith.' The wall running due south from the keep is called the 'Flanken Wall'. The bailey also includes references to a 'conduit', a 'magazine' and a 'bowling green' on the terrace
The lower cellars of the great hall below the bailey [photograph c. 1995] [Click here to open image in popup]
The lower cellars of the great hall below the bailey [photograph c. 1995]
The lower cellars of the great hall below the bailey [photograph c. 1995]
The steps leading from the bailey to the cellars of the great hall. In the foreground is the gothic arch which marks the lower cellar as an extension to the original cellar entered through a Norman arch [photograph c. 1995] [Click here to open image in popup]
The steps leading from the bailey to the cellars of the great hall. In the foreground is the gothic arch which marks the lower cellar as an extension to the original cellar entered through a Norman arch [photograph c. 1995]
The steps leading from the bailey to the cellars of the great hall. In the foreground is the gothic arch which marks the lower cellar as an extension to the original cellar entered through a Norman arch [photograph c. 1995]
This inauguration plaque for the castle museum lists the benefactors. [An official emblem of the castle is at the top of this plaster plaque which has been 'grained' to look like wood] [Click here to open image in popup]
This inauguration plaque for the castle museum lists the benefactors. [An official emblem of the castle is at the top of this plaster plaque which has been 'grained' to look like wood]
This inauguration plaque for the castle museum lists the benefactors. [An official emblem of the castle is at the top of this plaster plaque which has been 'grained' to look like wood]